Swim Workouts Swim Workouts

Location

Most of our team workouts are held at Hickey pool. Hickey pool is located near the MU bus terminal next to Hickey Gym. It is a seven-lane, 25-yard pool with lockers available to checkout by all UCD Triathlon Team members.

Our team offers five 1-hour swim workouts per week, in which 1 of the workouts will be run by our head coach and the rest will be student-coached.

Only paid members who have completed the appropriate sport club waivers will be allowed to come to team practices. You can find the sport club website here. Swim workshops will also be offered during the fall and throughout the year. Also, our head coach and student coordinators will be available during the swim workouts to help out anyone who wants help in improving their stroke technique (Don't hesitate to ask!).

During spring and summer, we will have various open water swim practices that will be held at either Lake Berryessa or Lake Natoma in Folsom. These workouts will be run by our head coach and will be announced via email and posted on the workout calendar.

Schedule

Our 2015-2016 academic year Swimming Schedule is

  • Monday: 4:00-5:00PM at Hickey Pool (Student Coached)
  • Tuesday: 4:00-5:00PM at Hickey Pool (Coach John Coached)
  • Wednesday: 4:00-5:00PM at Hickey Pool (Student Coached)
  • Thursday: 4:00-5:00PM at Hickey Pool (Coach John Coached)
  • Friday: 4:00-5:00PM at Hickey Pool (Student Coached)
  • During summer we share Hickey pool with swimming team. Mon to Fri from 2p.m. to 3p.m

* Workout times and locations may change so make sure to check the workout calendar for more details.

Workout Format

Practices will be organized according to swim ability (advanced, intermediate, and beginner swimmers). The head coach and student coordinators will provide organized swim sets for most, if not all the swim workouts. Each workout will cater towards your ability.

During the fall, swim workouts will focus more on stroke technique and getting back into swim shape. Winter and spring seasons will focus on building yardage and speed to prep for the upcoming race season. More information about how swim workouts are run will be offered during our team meetings.

Swim Technique Videos

Here are links to a few videos on freestyle technique and some swimming drills that we will be doing in practice.

Technique. Technique 2. This instructional portion of the first clip begins at 7:30 into the video. These clips include instruction from a former Olympian freestyle swimmer dissecting her own freestyle stroke. Although the swimmer swam shorter distances her review of the stoke, details a lot of good tips and insights for any freestyle swimmer. Please note the following: The 6 beat kick discussed in the first video clip is not a technique to use in a race or longer practices. Use a 2 beat or 4 beat kick for most practices and a 2 beat kick for races.

Drill: Body Position and High Hips. Body Position is the most critical aspect of swimming. Maintaining a nice horizontal line into the water, neck, back and hips in alignment, high in the water will reduce your drag and make for more efficient swimming.

Drill FIST. This drill is used to develop a more effective use of the forearm during the catch and down stroke phases of the stroke. During the fist drill you are essentially swimming with a closed hand (a fist). The fist is not tightly squeezed but loose. It is important during this drill to get good hip rotation (skate side to side) to allow for a long boat (stretched out body) in the water and to keep the elbow high during the stroke. This will set you up to get as much water under your fist and forearm as possible so you are using as much water as possible to pull you through the water efficiently. This drill is best done in 25-yard increments followed by 25 yards of traditional swimming. Alternative - each swim in which the drill is practiced, open one additional finger until a complete open palm is made.

Drill: Zipper. This drill is used to develop proper up-sweep portion of the stroke. Many novice swimmers will not follow through with their stroke far enough. It is important that as you complete your stroke that the hand reach the hip before it exits the water. In this drill you are swimming traditionally but on every stroke open up the thumb and brush your hip with the thumb as you pass along the hip. The hand and arm should exit the water at the hip. This drill is best done in 50-yard increments followed by 50 yards of traditional swimming.

Drill: FINGERTIP . This drill is used to develop proper recovery portion of the stroke from the time the arm exits the water to the time it re-enters the water. During this drill you are exaggerating the recovery portion of the stroke. Exaggerate a high elbow exit out of the water and forward movement of the arm back to the entry phase of the stroke. As the arm/hand is returning to the entry phase of the stroke drag the fingertips along the top of the water keeping the elbow high and arm tight to the body. Complete this pattern on every stroke. This drill is best done in 50-yard increments followed by 50 yards of traditional swimming. Combine the Thumb and Finger Tip drills into one drill

Drill: ONE ARM . This drill is used to develop proper hip rotation and full body/arm extension. During this drill you are swimming with one arm only while the other arm is position out in front of you. It is important to maintain a good kick while performing this drill to keep high body position in the water. Do not let the forward arm drop, particularly at the elbow. As you are swimming breath to the side of you’re stroking arm and concentrate on getting powerful hip rotation to drive the arm forward to full extension during any 25-yard length. Advance swimmers may place the forward arm at his/her side while performing this drill. This drill is best done in 50 yard increments (25 yards of right arm swimming then 25 yards of left arm swimming) followed by 50 yards of traditional swimming.

Drill: Kicking. Kicking on Side (alternate kick on each side with transition stroke to switch side every 1/4 length of pool): Flutter kicking is important to stabilize the arm stroke and help to maintain horizontal alignment in the water. Kicking is also used to propel you forward although for most novice swimmers it can acutely hinder your efficiency. Kicking begins at the hips. The power is generated through a forceful down sweep of the thigh. The lower portion of the leg follows the lead of the thigh through the down sweep with the knee only slightly bent. The ankle is flexed and the toes are pointed as much as possible. Kicking should be shallow, as the foot, at the end of its down stroke, should only be slightly below the chest or end at a depth of 12-14 inches.

Drill: Catch up. This drill is used to develop proper hip rotation and full arm/body extension. This is a version of the one arm drill. During this drill you are swimming with a delayed stroke. As one arm is taking a stroke the arm is only positioned out in front of you. Once the arm that is taking the stroke enters the waters and meets up hand to hand with the arm that is position in front of you the arm positioned in front of now takes its stroke while the other arm remains out in front of you. It is important to maintain a good kick while performing this drill to keep high body position in the water. Do not let the forward arm drop, particularly at the elbow. As you are swimming breath to the side of you’re stroking arm and only concentrate on one aspect of your stroke during any 25-yard length. This drill is best done in 50-yard increments followed by 50 yards of traditional swimming.